December 03, 2007

FLASH: Housing crash over! Phoenix has year-round golf and pro athletes!


Since we recently published the Time magazine "goo goo for housing" cover, and the Century 21 "Suzanne" commercial, I thought I'd hit for the trifecta and remind HP'ers of the stupidest realtor we've ever seen, and his now-hilarious 21 reasons why the Phoenix housing market wouldn't crash.

The chart above is for all of Phoenix (Maricopa County) c/o zillow.com. F*ck that's ugly, and it's gonna get worse. I guess the good news is the golf might get cheaper...


Damn, I pity that clueless realtor's clients. If he has any. They likely lost everything by now, all because they listened to a realtor who had no idea what he was talking about, except for his commission.

Here's reasons #20 and #21 - you'll have to google to find the rest. And please feel free to add to the "21 Reasons the Phoenix Housing Crash Will Be Historic" list.

20. A significant number of active and retired professional athletes maintain homes here, in no small part because the Phoenix/Scottsdale area has… 21. Year-around golf.

30 comments:

Frank@Scottsdale-Sucks.com said...

Hmm, two thoughts:

#1: Phoenix does *not* have year round golf, unless playing in 115-degree heat is something you enjoy.

#2: Every city has pro athletes. Phoenix has four pro teams, meaning the players must live there during the season. They don't have a choice.

Next time I bump into Mark McGwire at the gym (yes, we really go to the same gym), I'll ask him why he doesn't live in Phoenix like all the other pro athletes ... lol

Anonymous said...

Anyone stupid enough to listen to a prick like Greg Swann and Bloodhound Realty deserves to lose everything

He must be having the worst year of his life

Anonymous said...

That's one fugly chart!

Anonymous said...

FORE!

Anonymous said...

Reason #21 the crash will be historic:

21. Because the fraud got uncovered

Happy Homeowner in the Stix said...

So a lot of guys who play in the Cactus League (aka spring training) have homes in PV/Snottsdale. Big deal.

The bright side of playing golf in 115 degree heat is it's cheap! :P

Anonymous said...

Reason #22 there is an amazing number of strip joints in the PHX/Scottsdale area so all those realtwhores won't be out of work long.

Anonymous said...

frank ...I play golf in 120+ when I'm in Palm Springs during July. When I lived in LV I played in 115, no swea (literally no sweat since you don't sweat in such dry heat).

It is a stupid reason to buy a house, but Phoenix IS year round golf.

Anonymous said...

The chart shows a 9.3% decline. Not exactly the smoking gun for a housing crash dude. Given the 200% rise 1995-2005 that's nothing.

Anonymous said...

Money -- In another sign of the problems in the housing sector, homebuilder Lennar has unloaded 11,000 properties for 40 percent of their value, selling them to a joint venture it set up with the real estate arm of Morgan Stanley.

RichinAz said...

Playing golf in Phoenix in the summer is great you have the course almost to yourself and the rates are dirt cheap. But you have to like the heat. I do. And don't think about buying a house here for at least two more years this market has a long way to go for a bottom.

Anonymous said...

Reason #21 the crash will be historic:

#21 Because all those flat chested bimbos won't be able to get a HELOC to finance their boob jobs.

Small Hat

Anonymous said...

Reason #21 housing crash in Phoenix will be historic:

#21 The rate of people entering drug rehab will drop dramaticly because they can't finance their cocaine habit with a HELOC anymore.

Small Hat

Anonymous said...

#21 BMW dealers will go bankrupt because all the $30K "millionaires" won't be shopping anymore.

- Small Hat's better half

Anonymous said...

#21 housing decline will coinside with the coming Global Warming and turn over of water rights to the indians, so it will all dry up and just blow away...

Small Hat

Anonymous said...

#21 The housing decline will be historic because all the baby boomer snow birds will die and the Cougar whores will become baren from the VD and their won't be any new $30K "millionaires" born to support the growth.

-- Small Hat

Anonymous said...

Reason #22: Pheonix has world class real estate professionals.

lou said...

Speaking of having the worse year of his life - has the prick gone and removed the page? Google isnt showing anything

Anonymous said...

It might have 21 golf courses, but the real question is how many strip clubs are there?

Anonymous said...

the rent is already too high for the caliber of city that Phoenix is...i can't wait till my lease is up, and i can leave this place...big mistake moving here

Anonymous said...

How low will it go?

How low will it go?

Anonymous said...

http://www.bloodhoundrealty.com/BloodhoundBlog/?p=114

1. The migration from the Snow Belt states to Metropolitan Phoenix has been unabated for 60 years.
2. A similar extended migration is now occurring from the Northwestern states and Western Canada.
3. The “installed base” of all those migrants brings a steady stream of extended family members.
4. Proposition 13 makes moving up difficult in California; many Golden State sellers buy in the Phoenix area.
5. Californians in pursuit of other objectives — e.g., a friendlier business climate — migrate to the Valley of the Sun.
6. Baby Boomers will retire in droves to warmer climes — the Atlantic coast, the Gulf states and the Southwest.
7. Among those locales, Phoenix is by far the least prone to natural disasters.
8. Because of this, people from disaster-afflicted regions have formed a new stream of in-migration.
9. There is a steady migration of new residents from Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking countries south of the border.
10. Phoenix is a destination of choice or the second-landing city for immigrants from all over the world.
11. While higher oil prices will put a strain on our far-flung suburbs, the greatest pain will be felt in Northern states where fuel oil or natural gas are used as heat sources; even people who don’t hate the winter will move to the Phoenix area to escape high heating bills.
12. The Phoenix Metropolitan area is a dynamic jobs creation machine, adding tens of thousand of new jobs every year.
13. People who have or hope to have children move here as soon as they can manage it.
14. Compared to the areas from which many of our in-migrants are drawn, our homes are still very affordable.
15. We build thousands more new homes every year.
16. The Greater Phoenix area has 60 years of sustained practice at managing extreme growth — this in contrast to thrashing cities like Las Vegas.
17. Snowbirds, politely known as Our Winter Visitors, eventually move here year-around.
18. Our first waves of massive migration occurred after WW II; mustered out soldiers who had been stationed here came back with their families; this pattern continues among people who are posted here temporarily for various reasons.
19. People who stay at our resorts often fall in love with the Valley of the Sun and return as soon as they are able.
20. A significant number of active and retired professional athletes maintain homes here, in no small part because the Phoenix/Scottsdale area has…
21. Year-around golf.

Anonymous said...

Now watch this drive.

Anonymous said...

Hey Greg Swan!

Can I get fries with that ?

Anonymous said...

#1: The people who live there are too self absorbed to get prepared and they get hit hard.

#2: Tanning Salons outnumber libraries.

Anonymous said...

Reason: OneScottsdale and City North.

Anonymous said...

Historic Reason #21: The Law of Attraction - aka - God don't like ugly!

chris g said...

Reason #21 housing crash in Phoenix will be historic:

Because people like anon 12:04 (aka stupid ignorant fucktards) bought houses in 2004 and 2005.

Sequoia said...

Oh well hell sign me up I like playing golf on the surface of the freakin sun.

Get ready get set drop your drawers and grab your ankles.

Anonymous said...

WTF!?!?:
Jason Rose, another lobbyist working for the project, declined to identify the private investors who intend to help support Decades.

The park would be located in Eloy, with roller coasters and other rock-themed rides divided into sections associated with music through the decades, starting in the 1950s.

With the state's usual tourism base and with residents of Phoenix and Tucson nearby, Decades could attract at least 5.4 million visitors annually, according to Peter Alexander, the Epcot project manager and a consultant who worked on other parks, including Disneyland and the Six Flags chain.

Eloy is roughly 65 miles from downtown Phoenix and 60 miles from downtown Tucson.

"It's the only large metropolitan market . . . that doesn't have a theme park," Alexander said of the Phoenix area. "Obviously, it's the perception that it's too hot here."

But the heat index in the area averages 93 degrees in July compared with 92 in Orlando, Fla., home to Disney World, Alexander said. And Orlando was a small, sleepy town before the park opened there, he added.

Arizona's theme-park laws would have to be rewritten to allow Pinal County to establish a locally controlled district with bonding authority, DeMenna said.

If approved, it would allow the park's builders access to a $1 billion state fund for theme park construction, he said. Sales taxes that could reach 9 percent at the park would help repay the project's construction costs.

Martin West, the creative director of Decades, said he first envisioned a rock-themed amusement park more than a decade ago.

He and Alexander publicly discussed the proposed theme park a day after Mesa voters easily approved a land sale that helps clear the way for Waveyard, a water-sports resort planned for that city.

Next spring, Myrtle Beach, S.C., expects to open Hard Rock Park, a 140-acre, $400 million rock 'n' roll theme park after years of planning and construction.

Like the Decades plan, that park is divided into different sections based on genres of music. Decades is positioned as the West Coast counterbalance to that rock-themed park, which is owned by another investment group.

Decades' design plans include an 850-room luxury hotel on the park's grounds as well as at least 120,000 square feet of retail space.

West envisions an amphitheater similar to the former Compton Terrace in Phoenix and a 55,000-seat indoor concert hall.

Attractions could include an MTV logo in the center of the park intended to resemble the Arc de Triomphe in Paris and busts of rock legends reminiscent of Mount Rushmore.

Rose said licensing agreements with the various musical artists are among the details that need to be worked out if the state provides help with the legislation.